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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Jan 28, 2009 9:58am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

My son's algebra tutor starting talking music the other night and when i mentioned that I had a few dead concerts if he wanted them, the first one he requested was 12-29-68. Please tell me that I haven't been letting you in my house for the last few months and trusting you with my child's education? Could explain why he still has a C.....

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Poster: Bassy Twang Date: Jan 28, 2009 10:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

Scientific notation is the way that scientists easily handle very large numbers or very small numbers. For example, instead of writing 0.0000000056, we write 5.6 x 10-9. So, how does this work?

We can think of 5.6 x 10-9 as the product of two numbers: 5.6 (the digit term) and 10-9 (the exponential term).

Here are some examples of scientific notation.


10000 = 1 x 104 24327 = 2.4327 x 104
1000 = 1 x 103 7354 = 7.354 x 103
100 = 1 x 102 482 = 4.82 x 102
10 = 1 x 101 89 = 8.9 x 101 (not usually done)
1 = 100
1/10 = 0.1 = 1 x 10-1 0.32 = 3.2 x 10-1 (not usually done)
1/100 = 0.01 = 1 x 10-2 0.053 = 5.3 x 10-2
1/1000 = 0.001 = 1 x 10-3 0.0078 = 7.8 x 10-3
1/10000 = 0.0001 = 1 x 10-4 0.00044 = 4.4 x 10-4

As you can see, the exponent of 10 is the number of places the decimal point must be shifted to give the number in long form. A positive exponent shows that the decimal point is shifted that number of places to the right. A negative exponent shows that the decimal point is shifted that number of places to the left.

In scientific notation, the digit term indicates the number of significant figures in the number. The exponential term only places the decimal point. As an example,


46600000 = 4.66 x 107
This number only has 3 significant figures. The zeros are not significant; they are only holding a place. As another example,
0.00053 = 5.3 x 10-4
This number has 2 significant figures. The zeros are only place holders.
How to do calculations:

On your scientific calculator:

Make sure that the number in scientific notation is put into your calculator correctly.
Read the directions for your particular calculator. For inexpensive scientific calculators:

Punch the number (the digit number) into your calculator.
Push the EE or EXP button. Do NOT use the x (times) button!!
Enter the exponent number. Use the +/- button to change its sign.
Voila! Treat this number normally in all subsequent calculations.
To check yourself, multiply 6.0 x 105 times 4.0 x 103 on your calculator. Your answer should be 2.4 x 109.

On your cheap non-scientific calculator:

You will need to be familiar with exponents since your calculator cannot take care of them for you. For an introduction to rules concerning exponents, see the section on Manipulation of Exponents.

Addition and Subtraction:

All numbers are converted to the same power of 10, and the digit terms are added or subtracted.
Example: (4.215 x 10-2) + (3.2 x 10-4) = (4.215 x 10-2) + (0.032 x 10-2) = 4.247 x 10-2
Example: (8.97 x 104) - (2.62 x 103) = (8.97 x 104) - (0.262 x 104) = 8.71 x 104

Multiplication:
The digit terms are multiplied in the normal way and the exponents are added. The end result is changed so that there is only one nonzero digit to the left of the decimal.
Example: (3.4 x 106)(4.2 x 103) = (3.4)(4.2) x 10(6+3) = 14.28 x 109 = 1.4 x 1010
(to 2 significant figures)
Example: (6.73 x 10-5)(2.91 x 102) = (6.73)(2.91) x 10(-5+2) = 19.58 x 10-3 = 1.96 x 10-2
(to 3 significant figures)

Division:

The digit terms are divided in the normal way and the exponents are subtracted. The quotient is changed (if necessary) so that there is only one nonzero digit to the left of the decimal.
Example: (6.4 x 106)/(8.9 x 102) = (6.4)/(8.9) x 10(6-2) = 0.719 x 104 = 7.2 x 103
(to 2 significant figures)
Example: (3.2 x 103)/(5.7 x 10-2) = (3.2)/(5.7) x 103-(-2) = 0.561 x 105 = 5.6 x 104
(to 2 significant figures)

Powers of Exponentials:

The digit term is raised to the indicated power and the exponent is multiplied by the number that indicates the power.
Example: (2.4 x 104)3 = (2.4)3 x 10(4x3) = 13.824 x 1012 = 1.4 x 1013
(to 2 significant figures)
Example: (6.53 x 10-3)2 = (6.53)2 x 10(-3)x2 = 42.64 x 10-6 = 4.26 x 10-5
(to 3 significant figures)

Roots of Exponentials:

Change the exponent if necessary so that the number is divisible by the root. Remember that taking the square root is the same as raising the number to the one-half power.
Example:

Example:
Oops - the answer really is 4.2 x 10-3
QUIZ: Question 1 Write in scientific notation: 0.000467 and 32000000
Question 2 Express 5.43 x 10-3 as a number.
Question 3 (4.5 x 10-14) x (5.2 x 103) = ?
Question 4 (6.1 x 105)/(1.2 x 10-3) = ?
Question 5 (3.74 x 10-3)4 = ?
Question 6 The fifth root of 7.20 x 1022 = ?



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Answers: (1) 4.67 x 10-4; 3.2 x 107 (2)0.00543 (3) 2.3 x 10-10 (2 significant figures) (4) 5.1 x 108 (2 significant figures) (5) 1.96 x 10-10 (3 significant figures) (6) 3.73 x 104 (3 significant figures)

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 28, 2009 10:45am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

Amazing! And yes, though I am a scientist by training, "math" is not by area...also, was intrigued then worried by BTwang's description of such folk using scientific notation to measure/describe "very small things" as I thought it might somehow compromise my potential prom date with Miss Divine if I admitted I am in practice vis-a-vis "measuring a very small thing"...

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Poster: Miss Divine Date: Jan 28, 2009 7:15pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

"measuring a very small thing"

Ah, bless....never mind, we can just cuddle.

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 29, 2009 7:21am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

Ah, what a sweetie. I have just the selection of early era music to make it worthwhile, whatever happens. I will say though, that Dire always says "I just want to cuddle!" and Bessie finds out right quick he never settles for just that...hmmm, maybe in his case it was "curdle"...which is about the state of the cranial matter of other forumites having to read this I suppose.

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Jan 29, 2009 7:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

are you kidding me?? Bessie is always just playing coy. and damn, with that thick wet tongue of hers, my fillet mignon is never rare, but very very well done.



(good lord, i need more coffee)

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 29, 2009 7:49am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

Yuck...speaking of coffee, and cream, the damn half and half went bad! I am looking at tiny little curds in my cup right now! Probably because I read this out loud.

Hope you aren't too cold back there!

Jeezzzz! Sisters in KY are stuck in ice coated neighborhood, and just glad SDH, Cush and I are out West!

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Jan 29, 2009 7:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

beautiful blue bird mid-30's day here, thankfully helping to melt all the ice away. parking lots are a skating rink but roads are decent.

gotta admit though, wish i was out west too.

hope all is well with you Brother Tell

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Jan 28, 2009 10:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

You need to measure it to determine its very small? Not a good sign. Don't know about where you live but on AM radio here, every other commercial claims they have a solution to your problem.

Since 12-29-68 is a single disc show and my disc holders can carry two discs i took the liberty of also burning him a copy of 10-12-68. I am sure he will be disappointed.

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Poster: jglynn1.2 Date: Jan 28, 2009 11:19am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

Well if it not Will T then it must be Cliff.

I can't believe you let a guy who makes his living fishing tutor your kid in Math. Although, as a fisherman, Cliff should know how to weigh and measure the fish; so maybe it's alright.

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Poster: direwolf0701 Date: Jan 28, 2009 11:27am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

this is making me hanker for some sushi

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Poster: elbow1126 Date: Jan 28, 2009 11:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

which part? Cliff's fishing or Tell's minnow?

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Jan 28, 2009 11:35am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

Sure beats Wharf's chum

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Poster: William Tell Date: Jan 28, 2009 12:48pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Hey Tell, do you tutor math?

Touche!

"Tell's Minnow"

"Wharf's Chum"

We gotta make a list for all these phrases, I tell ya.